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Tire Information

 

 

How to read the tire:
On the outside, there is a wide range of information, all of which tell something about the individual tire.
The size of the tire is written, for example, as follows: 195 / 65R15.
195 is the width of the tire in millimeters.
65 is the height of the tire and corresponds to 45% of the width of the tire.
R is the design of the tire (R stands for radial tire).
15 is the size of the rim.

 

 

 

In addition, this information is present on the deck:

W is a speed symbol and shows how high a speed the tire is approved to drive (V is up to 240 km / h, W is up to 270 km / h and ZR is over 240 km / h).
RF stands for Reinforced - which means reinforced.
XL stands for Extra Load.
M + S is the term for winter tires / year-round tires.

It is recommended that winter tires also have a symbol with a mountain and snow in order for them to be best suited for winter driving.

 

All tires also have a DOT code on the side of the tire.
The code shows when the tire was produced.
From the year 2000, the code is four numbers instead of three numbers.
The first two figures indicate the week of production, while the last two indicate the year.

 

It is very important that the tire pressure is adapted to the car's fitted tire size, as well as how much ballast you drive with.
Once you have bought tires / wheels from Wheelsshop, the customer must ensure the correct tire pressure, as it is individual from car to car.
Wheelsshop recommends Continental's tire pressure guide see more here:

http://www.conti-luftdruck.de/index.php?gelesen=1

 

Speed index:
A letter can be read on all tires which indicates the speed code which corresponds to the top speed of the tire.

Below is what the letter means.

 

Speed index: Max. Approved speed in KM / T:

  • F max. 80 km/t
  •  
  • G max. 90 km/t
  •  
  • J max. 100 km/t
  •  
  • K max. 110 km/t
  •  
  • L max. 120 km/t
  •  
  • M max. 130 km/t
  •  
  • N max. 140 km/t
  •  
  • P max. 150 km/t
  •  
  • Q max. 160 km/t
  •  
  • R max. 170 km/t
  •  
  • S max. 180 km/t
  •  
  • T max. 190 km/t
  •  
  • H max. 210 km/t
  •  
  • V max. 240 km/t
  •  
  • W max. 270 km/t
  •  
  • Y max. 300 km/t
  •  
  • ZR over. 240 km/t

Load index:
A load index can be read on all tires, which indicates how much the tire can carry measured in kg per. PCS. The number can most often be found just before the speed letter.
It is important that the total weight for all 4 pcs. complies with the car's requirements and not least the axle pressure per. shaft.
Below is a reading chart for the tire's load index.

 

Tire load index: Load in kg:

  • 60 250
  • 61 257
  •  
  • 62 265
  • 63 272
  •  
  • 64 280
  • 65 290
  •  
  • 66 300
  • 67 307
  •  
  • 68 315
  • 69 325
  •  
  • 70 335
  • 71 345
  •  
  • 72 355
  • 73 365
  •  
  • 74 375
  • 75 387
  •  
  • 76 400
  • 77 412
  •  
  • 78 425
  • 79 437
  •  
  • 80 450
  • 81 462
  •  
  • 81 462
  • 82 475
  •  
  • 83 487
  • 84 500
  •  
  • 85 515
  • 86 530
  •  
  • 87 545
  • 88 560
  •  
  • 89 580
  • 90 600
  •  
  • 91 615
  • 92 630
  •  
  • 93 650
  • 94 670
  •  
  • 95 690
  • 96 710
  •  
  • 97 730
  • 98 750
  •  
  • 99 775
  • 100 800
  •  
  • 101 825
  • 102 850
  •  
  • 103 875
  • 104 900
  •  
  • 105 925
  • 106 950
  •  
  • 107 975
  • 108 1000
  •  
  • 109 1030
  • 110 1060
  •  
  • 111 1090
  • 112 1120
  •  
  • 113 1150
  • 114 1180
  •  
  • 115 1215
  • 116 1250
  •  
  • 117 1285
  • 118 1320
  •  
  • 119 1360
  • 120 1400
  •  
Pattern depth:
The law prescribes at least 1.6 mm, but professionals agree on: At least 2 mm on summer tires and at least 3 mm on winter tires.


Aquaplaning:
If you have wide tires (205 mm or more) or drive at high speed, the recommendation is: At least 3 mm on summer tires and at least 4 mm on winter tires.

 

Tire pressure:
Check it every month and before you go on vacation or longer trips.
It is best to check the tire pressure when the tires are fairly cold.
The tire pressure increases when the tires have become hot.
Too low tire pressure results in poorer steering and braking ability as well as increased fuel consumption.
If the tire pressure is too low, there is a risk that the tire will become too hot and burst.
On most cars there is a label with tire pressure at a door post or fuel filler flap.
The recommended tire pressure is always stated in the car's manual.
Tire pressure is usually given at normal and full load.
Use data for full load when there is a load on the car.
If the tire pressure is only given at normal load, it can advantageously be raised by 0.2 bar when driving at full load.
If you retrofit wider tires than the car was born with (205 mm or more), it requires a slightly higher pressure than what is stated in the instruction manual - often 0.2 bar higher.
Abnormal wear on the center of the tire can be the result of both too high or too low tire pressure.
Be sure to increase the tire pressure by 0.2 bar when using winter tires.
Note that spare wheels and tires on caravans must have fairly high tire pressures - typically around 4 bar.


Tires, repairs and repairs:
If a tire punctures and is repaired with a patch set / spray can or the tire is sealed from the outside without internal inspection, this is ONLY a temporary measure, intended to get the car to the nearest workshop, at a maximum of 80 km / h.
The same applies when using spare wheels or when using spare wheels where the tire is of a different type than the car's other tires.
The tire MUST always be removed from the rim during permanent tire repair so that internal inspection is possible.
If there are no consequential damages from the puncture, it is decided whether the tire can be repaired.
Permanent tire repair must be done on the inside of the tire.
The machined damage channel is filled with a vulcanizing material and covered with a suitable cover flap.


Runflat tires:
Some newer car models may have tires fitted from the factory that can be driven on after a puncture.
The tires are called "RunFlat" or similar.
The instruction manual will have information on how far and how fast you can drive on the tire after a puncture.
Contact a specialist workshop as soon as possible.
Cars with this type of tire must have an alarm system that warns against a drop in tire pressure.

Cars without an alarm system must not use "RunFlat" type tires.

 

Summer tires in summer - winter tires in winter:
If you drive all year round, we recommend that you switch to winter tires in the winter.
Both winter tires and year-round tires are marked with M + S (Mud + Snow).
If the tire is marked with a snowflake symbol, it has at least 7% better winter properties than M + S marked tires.
For the small driving need, eg 5,000 km per year, where the owner does not want to change tires summer / winter, we recommend leaving the car if there is snow or ice or at least letting the car be equipped with year-round tires.

The all-season tire has half of the advantages of the winter tire, but also half of the disadvantages.

 

Winter tires versus summer tires:
Approx. 40% shorter braking distance on ice, at 50 km / h the braking distance is typically 40 meters shorter.
Approx. 25% shorter braking distance on snow, at 50 km / h the braking distance is typically 10-15 meters shorter.
Approx. 12% longer braking distance on dry roads, at 50 km / h the braking distance is typically 1 meter longer and at 100 km / h typically 5 meters longer.
Approx. 10-20% longer braking distance on wet roads, at 50 km / h the braking distance is typically 1 meter longer and at 100 km / h typically 7 meters longer. Winter tires have significant advantages on snow and icy roads, but remember to slow down a bit on dry and wet roads.


 

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  Wheelsshop
part of JES Group ApS
Klokkerbakken 72
DK-8210 Aarhus V
Denamrk / EU
     
     
     
  mail@wheelsshop.com